We're Hiring

As Arts for the Aging forges ahead with a newly revitalized strategic plan celebrating recent growth and enrichment in our mission and programming, we are expanding and transitioning our team. We’re inviting applications for new and continuing full-time staff positions -- Program Director, Administrative Manager and Development Coordinator -- with anticipated interview and hire dates in March 2020. The job descriptions and application instructions are available via the links above. A cover letter, that describe how your skills and experience directly match the respective position, to accompany your resume is mandatory. No phone inquiries or snail mail applications, please.

Over the last two years our artistic faculty and reach to community partners has grown by 20%. 23 teaching artists --- five who are new introducing curricula in theatre, play-writing, poetry, and tango --- regularly reach 1,376 older adults and caregivers in 50 community and residential care settings and cultural institutions in the Greater Washington, D.C. region. Together with 600 annual and celebrated music, dance, and visual arts programs, these workshops provide accessible and uplifting ways to meet the effects of changing abilities that come with aging.

With the challenge that most of our staff is changing at once, comes the opportunity to bring on new colleagues around similar hiring timelines to partner with us in next exciting steps. We look forward to hearing from you.


Embraceable Tango Pillows

Since the embrace, abrazos, is core to tango dancing, and we often have more seniors in our workshops than teaching artists, these pillows were created by artists during the tango series as alternative dance partners, fully outfitted in the festive spirit of the dance. Pillows were auctioned off in support of our mission and tango programs. See more photos from the program series here and view videos here.


"The Rhythms of Life:" Integrating Percussion with Movement

Iona Senior Services welcomed AFTA teaching artists-in-training Chris Brown and Manny Arciniega to lead a program called, "The Rhythms of Life," which features musical technology and themes new to AFTA programming.

Chris and Manny began the program by playing for Iona's older adults as they walked into the room to join; Chris strummed a melody on the bass while Manny accompanied on percussion. To formally begin the program, Chris and Manny played Norah Jones' "Don't Know Why." The room swayed side to side and seniors clapped their hands to the beat of Chris' slow-jazz bass performance.

The program focused on rhythm and layering 'loops' to create textured music. To illustrate this, Manny assigned participants different movements and instruments to play at certain parts of a song. First, the participants practiced making a rhythm using motions with their hands and arms, such as moving them up and side, patting their stomachs, and even flapping like a bird, as suggested by a participant.

Later, Manny passed percussion instruments, including the maracas and the tambourine, throughout the room to be played in harmony with one another. The participants were split into sections, where one group would play their instrument first while another group would play right after them. Manny's instruction led to the room playing in a loop, making a continuous rhythm that repeated itself. Chris demonstrated a similar 'loop' by recording a bass line for the audience and playing over the recording to add new elements to it. The final product resulted in a beautifully synchronized percussive accompaniment to Chris' bass line to Stevie Wonder's "Isn't She Lovely."

Chris and Manny concluded their day at Iona Senior Services by playing "Happy Birthday" to celebrate a participant's special day. The room sang along together, applauding Chris and Manny's musical performance and program as it came to an end.

We're excited to offer this stimulating new music program to our partners this fall.


A Guest from the East

AFTA Teaching Artist (TA) Anthony Hyatt invited guests from India to experience two AFTA workshops. One of the guests, Neelima Pandit, is a traditional Kathak dancer.

In an interactive workshop with Quicksilver at Iona Senior Services, Neelima demonstrated Bharatnatyam dance.  The Quicksilver dancers borrowed from her movements and gestures in their own improvised dance. Later that week Neelima danced for participants at the Asian and Pacific Islander Senior Center in Washington, D.C.  She danced the story of Ganesh and performed the kuma, a dance in circles.

The Silver Singers, a dance and music performance group founded by Hyatt at the center, embraced Neelima and were eager to join her in dance.  With no shared language, the dancers passed movement back and forth in a beautiful conversation accompanied by Anthony’s live music.  Afterward Neelima shared that she was impressed by the AFTA teaching artists she observed, noting that few artists are so aware of and responsive to their audience members.

Watch Neelima share joyful movement with Chinese seniors at the center.

Neelima's guru in India, Mrs. Sharadini Gole, is still performing and teaching dance at 85 years old.